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285,526 members
167,505 posts
  • New
    Behringer
    Triber Moderator
    2022-05-23
     
    Great news - SYSTEM 15 and SYSTEM 35 are now shipping from the factory, while SYSTEM 55 will come a week later.
    We know it has taken much longer than we expected, but we finally got the missing parts so we were able to complete the production. Hopefully we'll have some more good news soon:-)
    Thanks for your patience. Much appreciated.
     
    ---
    Collaborate with our synth developers, share your ideas and get a chance to win free synthesizers by participating in our activities at our “Synthesizer and Drums Behringer Music Tribe" FB Group. We’d love to see you there!

    https://www.facebook.com/groups/KeysandDrumsBehringerMusicTribe/

    If you are a passionate and experienced mixed architecture hardware or embedded software engineer and would like to join the leading musical instrument team, please send your resume to [email protected]

    #WeHearYou #behringer #MusicTribe #synthesizer #synthesizers #drummachines
    read more...
    0 211
  • New
    Eptiar291
    Newcomer - Level 1
    2022-05-13

    Since the latest firmware update, the crave is no longer able to clock correctly to USB (latency) and the option to control the arp or sequencer's subdivision using the TEMPO knob has stopped. I've noticed other forums mention this issue too. Please hear us Behringer and fix this issue <3

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    0 16
    • Eptiar291
      PedroRodrigues Hi Eptiar291, thank you for your post, I would first suggest confirming that your unit is running the latest firmware available, version 1.1.3 via SYNTHTRIBE.

      It would suggest setting Clock source to TRIG CV in the App and test to see if it works.

      If this does not work, please follow the link below to request assistance request directly to our Tech Support Team:

      https://community.musictribe.com/pages/create-new-ticket?type=Technical%20Support&brand=Behringer


      I hope this helps.


      Thank you
      • May 14
      • Behringer Crave's Latest Firmware
        Eptiar291 Hia mate. Just tried using trig cv but my master clock is ableton. All the MIDI settings in ableton seem to be correct but still no luck. The feature to sub divide the arp/seq rhythms just isn't there anymore either. Would it be best to contact the support team?
        • May 14
  • New
    Milu
    Newcomer - Level 1
    2022-05-12

    Hi everyone,

    I bought a deepmind 12d and used it in mexico with 110v until now. I am in italy now and would like to know if I cam plug it into 220v without and voltage converter, or if I need to get one. I'm in italy since 1 week and can't find any trustable opinion yet. The former owner says he bought it in Europe and already used it with 220. But other synth gurus told me to get a converter or it will melt.

    On the back of the machine it says 110-240 next to the plug.

    Thank you

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    1 10
    • Milu
      PedroRodrigues Hi Milu, thank you for your post, please consider that the DeepMind 12 D has a power supply with Internal Switch-mode PSU Autorange 100-240 V,(50/60 Hz), this means that the unit will operate on 110V and 240V without the need of any voltage converter. This information is stated on the manual for your unit that you can access by following the link below: https://www.behringer.com/behringer/product?modelCode=P0CF7 Thank you
      • May 13
    • Milu
      RonaldFigura In the future you might want to vet your "gurus". A good guru would have suggested you check the specifications in the documentation. Like Pedro suggested.
      • May 20
  • New
    Behringer
    Triber Moderator
    2022-05-11

    We’re extremely proud to have gained another analog synthesizer icon to join our ever-growing synth engineering team. Scott has decades of analog synthesizer experience under his belt and built his own OB-X, CS-80 and many more. Check out his website http://www.cs80.com/.

     

    Scott is reading here, and you may want to send him some love:-)

    But let’s listen to his fascinating story:

     

    “As a child of mid ‘60s, the years of my youth went through that strange 5-year gap where electronics hobbyists transitioned from shortwave radio to homebrew computing. Living in that interesting time made me somewhat of a hybrid understudy of both analog and digital electronics. I was already being trained in piano but seeing performances like Virgil Fox’s masterful electronic organ recital and later Michael Iceberg’s “Iceberg Machine” one-man synth band performances at Disney World when he was set up in the Tomorrowland Terrace had me going: “That! I want to do that!”

     

    “That” of course would be me surrounded by these sleek electronic music synthesizers and playing those languid, spacey notes like the soundtrack to some not-yet-made sci-fi films. Of course, when a single polyphonic synthesizer in 1980 cost the same as my car, that dream would have to wait a few years as I went through engineering school. My father had the good grace to purchase a Paia P-4700j synthesizer kit that began a long friendship with Paia’s founder John Simonton. I probably learned more about analog and digital musical electronics putting that all together from Feb. to May 1980 than any other instance of my schooling. Sadly John is no longer with us, but he put my refurbished P-4700j in his Paia “Hall of Fame.” https://paia.com/hallofam/oldcrow/

     

    1983 is when the machine that would herald the (temporary) end of analog synthesizers as we knew them happened - the Yamaha DX7. I had already managed to buy a Korg Polysix at the closeout price of US$800 in 1984 but getting the US$2k needed for a DX7 meant taking out a loan and hoping the part-time work I did at a local electronics shop would cover it. Somehow, I managed and had this nice pairing of the DX7 with the Polysix except one had MIDI and one did not.

     

    Not yet, I should say. In the fall of 1985, I built a MIDI retrofit for the Polysix. MIDI was new then and figuring out the nature of such a circuit was interesting. I decided to simply install a keyboard switch matrix in parallel to the key bed and that way the keys and the MIDI would work together without any issues. I used a Zilog Z8 microcontroller as it was what we used at the electronics shop. That shop, Temp Inc., was a real boon to my early engineering years as I could tape out a board and etch it in their board shop. This was just before I started using PCB CAD in 1988: tape out was just that: black tape on vellum that was photographed in a UV light box to create the artwork negative. Of course, the boards weren’t plated through, silk-screened or solder masked, but they were circuit boards and they did just fine. In the below image a hand-etched board can be seen, with 121 wires creating the keyboard matrix that the incoming MIDI messages would operate. It worked just fine with the DX7.

     

    Of course, as a piano player I missed that weighted key action and now with a full-time job at Temp in 1986 I was able to invest in the core of my keyboard setup that comprised a Yamaha KX-88, which I still use to this day, a Yamaha TX816, and one of Bob Yannes’ wonderful Ensoniq Mirage rack units. With the addition of a digital reverb, harmonizer and some effects pedals, I finally had something I could call a synthesizer rig, and made enough music for an album:

    https://www.last.fm/music/Scott+Rider/The+Dichotomy+of+Time

     

    In the 1990s, older gear started to need servicing. The Polysix battery was notorious for compromising the patch manager circuit and given the number of folks having issues I decided to make an entire new board. I would continue to do this for a number of machines where the original board or board started to fail. The new boards meant all new parts and avoiding frequent failures as old parts individually started failing. This created a new problem: many analog synthesizers of the 70s, 80s and 90s resorted to custom ICs in order to deal with the complexity of the sound engine at a rational level. This is where my favorite engineering pastime was born, I was going to become a “vintage synthesizer archaeologist.” Analog was new again, and the now-vintage market started going up and up. A Minimoog in 1992 one could have for $750, in 2002 it was $3,000. More than ever keeping the old machines running was a worthwhile effort.

     

    In the early 2000s, I managed to purchase my still-favorite analog synthesizer - the Yamaha CS80. I would not be able to afford one today, which is why I spent several years perfecting what I call “discrete equivalent circuits” that replace the Yamaha custom ICs. This was necessary as I had only one CS80 and I wouldn’t likely find another one, hence I had to keep this one alive. A CS80 has 210 custom ICs and 70% of those are VCAs but that is how Yamaha did it in those days. If a modulation routing needed a level control, they provided one. Then they repeated it eight or sixteen times for each route. This is why the instrument has 40 circuit boards, which are exhibited “A” in my book “Why They Built Things the Way They Did, and Why They Will Never Build Them That Way Again”. The CS-80 is a beautiful beast and entirely a product of the era in which it was made.

     

    I made the filter which turned into a 5U module called the MOTM-480. A later revision using Coolaudio V2164s in place of the lamentably obsoleted CA3280 turned out to be even better, I called it the M480 MkII or RR480 in honor of my friend Robert Rich who uses them frequently. I’ve made the VCA, the VCO, the EGs and I had everything ready for the day the CS80 needed them.

    It was about this time (2012), I was reviewing other vintage machines I’d like to have, but market pricing drove the ability to buy right out. I’d already wanted an OB-X, simply because it had that deep, glassy booming power that was in a different sonic sphere than Moog or Yamaha. I looked online for prices, which turned out to be $7000 for a broken one. Well eff that, I said, I’ll just make a 4-voice OB-X of my own. No programmable presets even though I could do it, I was mainly after that sound. It took 4 months, but I had my CrowBX, and it is awesome.

     

     

    I also made a Minimoog for a friend who lost theirs in hurricane Katrina called Crowminus.

     

    I always wanted to build the machines that make these wonderful tones, and I want to build them in such a way they can be afforded by most anyone. That is why I am here now as a part of Music Tribe and Behringer, because their vision matches my vision. I’m very excited that Behringer is designing their CS-80 version called DS-80 and I’ll surely team up with John Price who’s leading that project.

     

    I have now started to work on the new Behringer UB-X, which will greatly benefit from my CrowBX experience. I know the sound, I know the circuits, I will get it done and I absolutely love it.” - Scott “Old Crow” Rider

     

    -

    Collaborate with our synth developers, share your ideas and get a chance to win free synthesizers by participating in our activities at our “Synthesizer and Drums Behringer Music Tribe" FB Group. We’d love to see you there! https://www.facebook.com/groups/KeysandDrumsBehringerMusicTribe

     

    If you are a passionate and experienced mixed architecture hardware or embedded software engineer and would like to join the leading musical instrument team, please send your resume to [email protected]

     

    #WeHearYou #behringer #MusicTribe #synthesizer #synthesizers #drummachines #oberheim #obx

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    3 337
  • New
    Behringer
    Triber Moderator
    2022-05-10

    We’re very excited that BRAINS is now the best-selling oscillator module, with a 5-star rating. With our new firmware upgrade, it’s now also the only module that runs on 96 kHz. Thanks for all your support!

    Collaborate with our synth developers, share your ideas and get a chance to win free synthesizers by participating in our activities at our “Synthesizer and Drums Behringer Music Tribe" FB Group. We’d love to see you there!

    https://www.facebook.com/groups/KeysandDrumsBehringerMusicTribe/

    If you are a passionate and experienced mixed architecture hardware or embedded software engineer and would like to join the leading musical instrument team, please send your resume to [email protected]

    #WeHearYou #behringer #MusicTribe #synthesizer #synthesizers #drummachines

     

    read more...
    1 4
  • New
    CCTV530
    Newcomer - Level 1
    2022-05-09

    Please help with getting CRAVE connected to Reaper DAW

    0 3
    • CCTV530
      NicJonesMT Hi CCTV530.
      Please click support at the top of the page and submit a tech support ticket.
      Can you please provide some screen shots of how you are currently setup and we can then advise what needs adjusting to get you up and running.
      • May 10
  • New
    PrimevalMudd
    Newcomer - Level 1
    2022-05-07

    Hi,

    What messages do I need to send to my Crave to select sequencer patterns in the Crave?

    I've tried standard Program Change messages and full MSB/LSB messages but to no avail.

    Recording the Crave's MIDI output while changing patterns gave me no clues.

    I'm using an Arturia DrumBrute Impact, a Korg Monologue and Volca Keys, and a Behringer Crave and RD-6, for squelchy-bleepy-beaty jams with some electric guitar thrown in.

    The Monologue responds to standard Program Change messages and the DrumBrute Impact responds to messages per the MIDI implimentation in the attached screenshot, taken from Arturia's website: https://support.arturia.com/hc/en-us/articles/4405741191314-DrumBrute-Impact-Tips-Tricks

    I've not been able to find the equivalent document for the Crave (or the RD-6!)

    The Volca Keys doesn't respond to program change messages for its patterns but I don't tend to use its sequencer so that's not so much of a problem.

    I do use the Crave's sequencer but changing patterns while playing guitar is somewhat tricky!

    Thanks. 

     

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    0 15
    • PrimevalMudd
      NicJonesMT Hi PrimevalMudd.
      Can you please click support at the top of the page and submit a technical support ticket. We can then raise this with the development team
      • May 8
  • New
    RonaldFigura
    Contributor - Level 2
    2022-05-03

    What folder are the Bank SysEx files stored in for version 1.0.6 of the DeepMind12 app? For app version 1.0.5 I was able to locate the Phat 12 folder on my 2015 Macbook Pro (High Sierra). When I run version 1.0.6 the custom SysEx files I have in the Phat12 folder are not available. 

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    0 8
    • RonaldFigura
      PedroRodrigues Hi RonaldFigura, thank you for your post, in this case I would suggest to check if the folder is not among the "hidden items on your MAC's view. For that I would suggest to follow the link below to access the guide to view hidden items on your MAC : https://www.ionos.co.uk/digitalguide/server/configuration/showing-hidden-files-on-a-mac/ I hope this helps. Thank you
      • May 4
      • DeepMind Mac app 1.0.6
        RonaldFigura Yes, I am aware of the hidden folders and have enabled seeing hidden folders. What I would like to know is the file path to the Deepmind SysEx files. I found it for version 1.0.5. But when I installed version 1.0.6 on my 2015 MacBook Pro I cannot see some custom SysEx files I created previously. I am mainly using the librarian portion of the app. So once again, what is the file path?
        • May 4
    • RonaldFigura
      RonaldFigura

      • May 6
    • RonaldFigura
      RonaldFigura

      Any ideas? Is there a software engineer I can speak to?

      • May 6
  • New
    Jo999
    Newcomer - Level 1
    2022-04-21

    Is this Normal?  For the drone to be a solid beep? I can't imagine...


    View Video
    0 6
  • New
    radiorosbrera
    Newcomer - Level 1
    2022-04-15

    in years of Jazz streaming (9500 tracks per month), specially Italian, I noticed that very few musicians are using synths and the production across a decade needs new colors, new tunes and vibes.

    I would like to promote an initiative through our radio to innovate the talent of musicians buying a synth, embracing the synth challenge.

    Among the manufacturers your brand is offering really affordable and flexible devices, machines to think sounds not only to use snappy presets and midi stuffs.

    So here I am, as music selector, to inspire the brain of young jazzmen to make the choice to extend their brain with a synthesizer.

    I work with all of them, I spin all their tracks and often I try to push them to buy a synth and to do new sounds.

    I had not other chance to try to contact Behringer but this one.

    I hope that we can propell a new thing together.

    best

    Mariano Equizzi

    Music Selector @ www.radiorosbrera.com

    #neverthesametrack

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    0 4
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