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Behringer

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Behringer

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167,513 posts
  • New
    DonSealer
    Contributor - Level 2
    2022-05-14

    Is there anyone here who would be willing to help me with the Mixing Station Pro app?  I've had it installed for a week or so now and it seems I have nothing but questions and problems.  I hear people say that this app is so great but that's  not my experience.   I am so frustrated at this moment I'm ready to scrap it all.  I've got my first gig in a couple of weeks and at this time I can't access my mixer.  it's been one situation after another.  I don't see any reason to detail my problems unless I can get some interest. I'm not able to find any support for the app either.

    Don.....

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    0 11
  • New
    Eptiar291
    Newcomer - Level 1
    2022-05-13

    Since the latest firmware update, the crave is no longer able to clock correctly to USB (latency) and the option to control the arp or sequencer's subdivision using the TEMPO knob has stopped. I've noticed other forums mention this issue too. Please hear us Behringer and fix this issue <3

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    0 16
    • Eptiar291
      PedroRodrigues Hi Eptiar291, thank you for your post, I would first suggest confirming that your unit is running the latest firmware available, version 1.1.3 via SYNTHTRIBE.

      It would suggest setting Clock source to TRIG CV in the App and test to see if it works.

      If this does not work, please follow the link below to request assistance request directly to our Tech Support Team:

      https://community.musictribe.com/pages/create-new-ticket?type=Technical%20Support&brand=Behringer


      I hope this helps.


      Thank you
      • May 14
      • Behringer Crave's Latest Firmware
        Eptiar291 Hia mate. Just tried using trig cv but my master clock is ableton. All the MIDI settings in ableton seem to be correct but still no luck. The feature to sub divide the arp/seq rhythms just isn't there anymore either. Would it be best to contact the support team?
        • May 14
  • New
    Wishbonemusic1
    Newcomer - Level 1
    2022-05-13

    I have just bought the Behringer U-PHORIA UMC22 Audio Interface as it is a decent price yet is stated on Behringers own website as having low Latencey. After following all instruction including those of videos on Youtube I cannot get Latency below 1000ms. I'm sure its not my computer as its is a gaming computer with a really fast processor so I can only come to the conclusion the UMC22 is just not up to the job?

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    0 7
    • Wishbonemusic1
      PedroRodrigues Hi Wishbonemusic1,thank you for your post, to evaluate any latency values, you will need to have in to consideration if you are using a Mac or a Windows computer because on Windows computer you will have the drivers transporting the audio from the sound card to the CPU of the computer and them from the CPU of the computer to the sound card again and from there to the speakers.
      In a case of a Mac is different because Mac uses core audio device.

      We also need to consider when addressing latency, the following:
      The computer CPU speed.
      Audio interface quality.
      The type of connection. USB/FIREWIRE.
      The compatibility driver/operating system/ DAW.
      The amount of buffering selected on the DAW, measured in samples.

      Increasing the buffering size gives the computer more time to respond to the audio, per example when you are using plug ins, this is very important but also slows the response of the all system.

      All these points can be addressed to decrease latency issues, but this scenario will also create less stability for your system.


      Latency can be proportional to:


      The number of audio channels used
      Number of Plugins used
      Sample Rate
      Bit Depth
      Amount of Memory
      Processing Power


      I would suggest to checking on the preferences on the DAW what Buffer size are you using and I would suggest using a Buffer size between 256 and 512 samples.


      I hope this clarifies this matter


      Thank you
      • May 13
  • New
    DennisMilsom
    Contributor - Level 2
    2022-05-13

    I have set up so that some of the channels (and a USB channel) go to the monitor send, however the monitor knob has no effect on the output. The slider in the app also has no effect.

     

    The level is fixed and no changes to either the master fader, channel faders or the monitor send fader does anything.

     

    How does one set it up so that monitor faders DO work? I mean they will, otherwise they woudln't be there, but I cannot get them to.

     

    Thanks

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    0 12
  • New
    Milu
    Newcomer - Level 1
    2022-05-12

    Hi everyone,

    I bought a deepmind 12d and used it in mexico with 110v until now. I am in italy now and would like to know if I cam plug it into 220v without and voltage converter, or if I need to get one. I'm in italy since 1 week and can't find any trustable opinion yet. The former owner says he bought it in Europe and already used it with 220. But other synth gurus told me to get a converter or it will melt.

    On the back of the machine it says 110-240 next to the plug.

    Thank you

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    1 10
    • Milu
      PedroRodrigues Hi Milu, thank you for your post, please consider that the DeepMind 12 D has a power supply with Internal Switch-mode PSU Autorange 100-240 V,(50/60 Hz), this means that the unit will operate on 110V and 240V without the need of any voltage converter. This information is stated on the manual for your unit that you can access by following the link below: https://www.behringer.com/behringer/product?modelCode=P0CF7 Thank you
      • May 13
    • Milu
      RonaldFigura In the future you might want to vet your "gurus". A good guru would have suggested you check the specifications in the documentation. Like Pedro suggested.
      • May 20
  • New
    zamboknee
    Newcomer - Level 1
    2022-05-12

    Does the Studio Xl monitor controller have source mixing capability?

    0 4
  • New
    Behringer
    Triber Moderator
    2022-05-12
     
     
     
    "We haven't settled on a name for it. One kid likes Mount Behringer and another likes the Great Wall of Behringer. We just moved and the studio is about 90% unpacked. Now I must find somewhere for all my boxes. This is about half of them." - Scott M.
    -
    Collaborate with our synth developers, share your ideas and get a chance to win free synthesizers by participating in our activities at our "Synthesizer and Drums Behringer Music Tribe" FB Group. We’d love to see you there!
    If you are a passionate and experienced mixed architecture hardware or embedded software engineer and would like to join the leading musical instrument team, please send your resume to [email protected].
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    0 16
  • New
    Behringer
    Triber Moderator
    2022-05-11

    We’re extremely proud to have gained another analog synthesizer icon to join our ever-growing synth engineering team. Scott has decades of analog synthesizer experience under his belt and built his own OB-X, CS-80 and many more. Check out his website http://www.cs80.com/.

     

    Scott is reading here, and you may want to send him some love:-)

    But let’s listen to his fascinating story:

     

    “As a child of mid ‘60s, the years of my youth went through that strange 5-year gap where electronics hobbyists transitioned from shortwave radio to homebrew computing. Living in that interesting time made me somewhat of a hybrid understudy of both analog and digital electronics. I was already being trained in piano but seeing performances like Virgil Fox’s masterful electronic organ recital and later Michael Iceberg’s “Iceberg Machine” one-man synth band performances at Disney World when he was set up in the Tomorrowland Terrace had me going: “That! I want to do that!”

     

    “That” of course would be me surrounded by these sleek electronic music synthesizers and playing those languid, spacey notes like the soundtrack to some not-yet-made sci-fi films. Of course, when a single polyphonic synthesizer in 1980 cost the same as my car, that dream would have to wait a few years as I went through engineering school. My father had the good grace to purchase a Paia P-4700j synthesizer kit that began a long friendship with Paia’s founder John Simonton. I probably learned more about analog and digital musical electronics putting that all together from Feb. to May 1980 than any other instance of my schooling. Sadly John is no longer with us, but he put my refurbished P-4700j in his Paia “Hall of Fame.” https://paia.com/hallofam/oldcrow/

     

    1983 is when the machine that would herald the (temporary) end of analog synthesizers as we knew them happened - the Yamaha DX7. I had already managed to buy a Korg Polysix at the closeout price of US$800 in 1984 but getting the US$2k needed for a DX7 meant taking out a loan and hoping the part-time work I did at a local electronics shop would cover it. Somehow, I managed and had this nice pairing of the DX7 with the Polysix except one had MIDI and one did not.

     

    Not yet, I should say. In the fall of 1985, I built a MIDI retrofit for the Polysix. MIDI was new then and figuring out the nature of such a circuit was interesting. I decided to simply install a keyboard switch matrix in parallel to the key bed and that way the keys and the MIDI would work together without any issues. I used a Zilog Z8 microcontroller as it was what we used at the electronics shop. That shop, Temp Inc., was a real boon to my early engineering years as I could tape out a board and etch it in their board shop. This was just before I started using PCB CAD in 1988: tape out was just that: black tape on vellum that was photographed in a UV light box to create the artwork negative. Of course, the boards weren’t plated through, silk-screened or solder masked, but they were circuit boards and they did just fine. In the below image a hand-etched board can be seen, with 121 wires creating the keyboard matrix that the incoming MIDI messages would operate. It worked just fine with the DX7.

     

    Of course, as a piano player I missed that weighted key action and now with a full-time job at Temp in 1986 I was able to invest in the core of my keyboard setup that comprised a Yamaha KX-88, which I still use to this day, a Yamaha TX816, and one of Bob Yannes’ wonderful Ensoniq Mirage rack units. With the addition of a digital reverb, harmonizer and some effects pedals, I finally had something I could call a synthesizer rig, and made enough music for an album:

    https://www.last.fm/music/Scott+Rider/The+Dichotomy+of+Time

     

    In the 1990s, older gear started to need servicing. The Polysix battery was notorious for compromising the patch manager circuit and given the number of folks having issues I decided to make an entire new board. I would continue to do this for a number of machines where the original board or board started to fail. The new boards meant all new parts and avoiding frequent failures as old parts individually started failing. This created a new problem: many analog synthesizers of the 70s, 80s and 90s resorted to custom ICs in order to deal with the complexity of the sound engine at a rational level. This is where my favorite engineering pastime was born, I was going to become a “vintage synthesizer archaeologist.” Analog was new again, and the now-vintage market started going up and up. A Minimoog in 1992 one could have for $750, in 2002 it was $3,000. More than ever keeping the old machines running was a worthwhile effort.

     

    In the early 2000s, I managed to purchase my still-favorite analog synthesizer - the Yamaha CS80. I would not be able to afford one today, which is why I spent several years perfecting what I call “discrete equivalent circuits” that replace the Yamaha custom ICs. This was necessary as I had only one CS80 and I wouldn’t likely find another one, hence I had to keep this one alive. A CS80 has 210 custom ICs and 70% of those are VCAs but that is how Yamaha did it in those days. If a modulation routing needed a level control, they provided one. Then they repeated it eight or sixteen times for each route. This is why the instrument has 40 circuit boards, which are exhibited “A” in my book “Why They Built Things the Way They Did, and Why They Will Never Build Them That Way Again”. The CS-80 is a beautiful beast and entirely a product of the era in which it was made.

     

    I made the filter which turned into a 5U module called the MOTM-480. A later revision using Coolaudio V2164s in place of the lamentably obsoleted CA3280 turned out to be even better, I called it the M480 MkII or RR480 in honor of my friend Robert Rich who uses them frequently. I’ve made the VCA, the VCO, the EGs and I had everything ready for the day the CS80 needed them.

    It was about this time (2012), I was reviewing other vintage machines I’d like to have, but market pricing drove the ability to buy right out. I’d already wanted an OB-X, simply because it had that deep, glassy booming power that was in a different sonic sphere than Moog or Yamaha. I looked online for prices, which turned out to be $7000 for a broken one. Well eff that, I said, I’ll just make a 4-voice OB-X of my own. No programmable presets even though I could do it, I was mainly after that sound. It took 4 months, but I had my CrowBX, and it is awesome.

     

     

    I also made a Minimoog for a friend who lost theirs in hurricane Katrina called Crowminus.

     

    I always wanted to build the machines that make these wonderful tones, and I want to build them in such a way they can be afforded by most anyone. That is why I am here now as a part of Music Tribe and Behringer, because their vision matches my vision. I’m very excited that Behringer is designing their CS-80 version called DS-80 and I’ll surely team up with John Price who’s leading that project.

     

    I have now started to work on the new Behringer UB-X, which will greatly benefit from my CrowBX experience. I know the sound, I know the circuits, I will get it done and I absolutely love it.” - Scott “Old Crow” Rider

     

    -

    Collaborate with our synth developers, share your ideas and get a chance to win free synthesizers by participating in our activities at our “Synthesizer and Drums Behringer Music Tribe" FB Group. We’d love to see you there! https://www.facebook.com/groups/KeysandDrumsBehringerMusicTribe

     

    If you are a passionate and experienced mixed architecture hardware or embedded software engineer and would like to join the leading musical instrument team, please send your resume to [email protected]

     

    #WeHearYou #behringer #MusicTribe #synthesizer #synthesizers #drummachines #oberheim #obx

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    3 337
  • New
    Basssix
    Newcomer - Level 1
    2022-05-10

    I am new to the X32 and am trying to get things working. I want to connect to a DAW but can not seem to get the X - USB to work properly. I have tried Tracks Live, Reaper, and Studio One 5 and can not get any of them to acknowledge the X-USB connection. Is there anything that must be done on the board for it to work?

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    0 20
    • Basssix
      Paul_Vannatto If you are using a Windows computer, you need to download and install the ASIO drivers (X-USB Audio Driver Version 5.12.0) found here:
      https://www.behringer.com/product.html?modelCode=P0ASF
      (under Product Library, Software on right side)
      • May 10
    • Basssix
      Basssix

      I did that and it still doesn't work.

      • May 10
    • Basssix
      Paul_Vannatto Make sure the USB cable is plugged into the X-USB port in the back of the X32 and in a USB 2.0 port in the computer (not in a hub or in a USB 3.x port). If you have confirmed that is correct, I would suggest you replace the USB cable (yes they do go bad).
      • May 10
    • Basssix
      Basssix

      I have done that as well.

      • May 10
    • Basssix
      Paul_Vannatto Did the ASIO drivers install correctly (there should be an X-USB interface in the toolbar that should show the connection status)? If so, in Reaper, goto the Options, Preferences, Audio, Devices and select the X-USB for inputs and outputs.
      • May 10
  • New
    MichaelGrohl
    Contributor - Level 2
    2022-05-10

    Yes, i am not to first one speaking this out in the past decade.

    But why is it, that this still has not been solved yet? Is there a technical reason for it?

    I know, historicaly mixers link channels in pairs odd/even.

    Believe it or not, if I would prefer to stick to the features and specs of an analog desk, i would use an analog desk.

     

    I guess most or at least many users had scenarios where they would have linked channels even/odd if it was possible.

    As it isn't, they leave channels blank (IF they have enough channels), use DCAs just for this, sort channels in a different order as they would prefer or even drop signals as a "workaround".

    Yes, this "works" in most situations. But for me, this seems not as comfortable and innovative as this desk is.

    Updates brought MASSIVE improvements in the past (for me the biggest one: "user banks" for routing).

    I realy realy hope to see some flexibility in channel linking in the future.

     

    what do you think about that?

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    0 11
    • MichaelGrohl
      Paul_Vannatto The answer to your question is yes, there is a technical reason for only odd/even channel strip linking. It is the way the DSP engine (of the X32/M32) is designed. Please understand that the DSP design is 10+ years old and compromises had to be made in order to produce the X32 at less than half of it's competitors back in 2012. All of the ranting you want to do on the subject won't change the fact that it is what it is. The workaround is either move channel strips around (using X32 Scene Parser's channel arranger tool), use the User layers of X32-Edit or Mixing Station, or get a Wing.
      • May 10
    • MichaelGrohl
      MichaelGrohl

      Thank you Paul!! I did not thought that this alteration would challange the dsp at all. But if that is the case, it is of course understandable an as you said: it is what it is. On the other hand it is a bit sobering. As a non expert in dsp or software, not seeing that this alteration would significant affect dsp performance, this lets me guess that the dsp is so at limit that we could not expect any additional features at all.

      • May 10
    • MichaelGrohl
      Paul_Vannatto I wouldn't say there wouldn't be any additional features. But what they do add will be limited in scope. For example, in firmware 4.0, they added the User In and User Out routing screens. But those are only indexes to existing inputs and outputs, which don't require very much space or power/performance of the DSP. From what I've been told, changing the odd/even pairing is a completely different story.
      • May 10
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