Solutions

260,181 members
138,680 posts
  • tomafilm
    Contributor - Level 1
    2011-02-02
    Hi,

    do I have to use SRAM card or can I expand wit PCMCIA card reader/writer + smart card for the unit extension?

    Has anybody try it?

    TXs

    Thomas Markus
    0 707
  • snowleopard
    Contributor - Level 2
    2011-02-01
    Does anyone know if the TC Electronic Studio units (FireworX, M3k, GC Pre, F96k, etc) accept AC-coupled signals or DC only. Best info I could find was the generic:

    Word-clock = RCA Phono, 75 ohm, 0.6 to 10 Vpp, 30 - 50 Khz (32 - 48 Khz in some documentation)

    And yes, I've read the technical library docs. Further enlightenment on this poorly documented interface would be appreciated.


    Thanks.



    PS: and maybe someone could explain why they're using cr4ppy consumer RCA instead of BNC on Pro equipment particularly since my Konnekt48 has BNC WC i/o, or is external word-clock an afterthought throw in?
    read more...
    0 1,798
    • snowleopard
      snowleopard I received an answer to a support request, I'll post it here for everyone else:



      Thank you for contacting TC Group Support.



      The mentioned units will accept both



      I hope this information has been helpful. If you should have any additional questions, please feel free to update this incident and I will be happy to assist you further.



      Best regards,

      TC Group International
      • February 14, 2011
  • Gman1
    Contributor - Level 2
    2011-02-01
    Has anyone tried one of these with the G system? I am trying to decide between the Boss FV-500H and the Dunlop. I would appreciate any feedback -Thanks!
    0 22,559
    • Gman1
      Mel To control the Volume level of the G-Sys I would think that an expression pedal would be preferred over a volume pedal since it is not being used as a volume pedal but as an expression pedal controlling volume. Big difference. I'd be curious if that has been the experience of others.
      • February 1, 2011
    • Gman1
      Laird_Williams

      Mel wrote:

      To control the Volume level of the G-Sys I would think that an expression pedal would be preferred over a volume pedal since it is not being used as a volume pedal but as an expression pedal controlling volume. Big difference. I'd be curious if that has been the experience of others.


      Actually, high-impedance volume pedals seem to work the best. They seem to be what the encoders in the G like to see.
      • February 1, 2011
    • Gman1
      JerryBeck Hi,

      I stood before the same question.

      I found this to work for me:

      I got two Boss FV-500H, operating one for the volume control with a y-cable, the other one for the expression control with a single TRS cable into the expression jack.

      Although the calibration for the expression control just goes up to something in the 70s, they both are working great and reliable.

      Just make sure you don't unplug/plug them when the unit is running.

      Hope this helps,

      Jerry
      • February 2, 2011
    • Gman1
      DF72 I 'm standing before the same decission: DVP1, FH500 or EB Jr.



      There's been a lot of things said about the later two, but nothing about the DVP1.

      So I thought I'll write Dunlop to get an answer.

      Here it is:



      //JimDunlop Tech

      ...

      The DVP1 will work for the volume section. It also look like it may work

      as the expression pedal but there is a notice in the manual for the

      G-System that volume pedals most likely give an unsatisfying result.



      Important Note

      * True expression pedals can be used to control

      all types of parameters in G-System.

      * Regular volume pedals should only be used to

      control volume parameters. Using a regular

      volume pedal to control e.g. whammy or wah

      effects, will most likely give an unsatisfying

      result.

      ...

      //JimDunlop Tech end



      Somehow I get the feeling, this information isn't quite right, or am I wrong?

      The FH500 is used as a volume pedal, too, or?



      Thanx for this great forum...



      Greetz

      Dave
      • February 16, 2011
    • Gman1
      mptrin I have a DVP1 that I use for small gigs as an expression pedal for my Nova System. I connect it with an easy expression convertor and it works really well.

      -MP
      • February 16, 2011
  • craiguitar
    Contributor - Level 2
    2011-01-30
    Can anyone help me with this... While I can change the 'key' in the pitch block, why when I select a different 'scale' Say Lydian, Mixolodian etc, there is no difference at all, this parameter seems to do nothing! Is there a setting which disables this parameter, as it seems to make no sense why it will not work.
    read more...
    0 17,126
    • craiguitar
      TC-Mike Hi Craig,



      when changing scales in the intelligent pitch shifter, the new selected scale won't be active/change intervals unless you change one of the voice parameters. this is a a software bug. as a workaround just navigate to one of the PIT Voice parameters and set

      the parameter back and forth for the scale change to take effect.



      cheers,



      Mike
      • February 7, 2011
    • craiguitar
      craiguitar Fantastic, thanks Mike for your help, I will give that a try.
      • February 7, 2011
    • craiguitar
      bobgilles I have tried everything, the scale will store, but the it just sounds like a straight 3rd note, the scales are not working, should I send this unit in for service?



      I can change the intervals and when I change the scales, no audible difference. The screen says HrmMinor, but it sure as hell is not an Harmonic Minor scale. I am on tour and I will pay money to solve this problem. Thanks
      • September 6, 2011
    • craiguitar
      bobgilles Is there a bug fix for the bad software issue, I wonder if the support guy knows about this?
      • September 8, 2011
    • craiguitar
      bobgilles I need to send my G Major 2 into service, I have tried for months to get somebody to respond. What should I do?
      • September 8, 2011
  • mjdyson
    Contributor - Level 1
    2011-01-30
    Hello everyone.. just picked up an RH450 at my local shop - I'm hugely impressed with what has been accomplished with the amp!

    I've got a question regarding the foot controller port.

    I already have a midi controller in my setup and wondering if it can be used to switch the channels on the amp?

    The question is really, does the foot controller use a standard midi interface (by means of signals)? Or is it some proprietary signal that uses MIDI ports out of convenience?


    Cheers,

    Mark
    read more...
    0 2,673
  • yogurtboy
    Contributor - Level 2
    2011-01-29
    i got a RS210 the other day. Sounded good, but I really found it awkward to carry. It definitely requires its own trip from the car, and I'd much prefer to make one trip (at least for rehearsals). I returned it for an RS112. Now I can carry everything in one trip from the car again.

    But for gigs, I'd consider getting a second RS112, but here's the thing...

    The 2x10 and 2x12 cabs are rated at 400w @ 8 ohms

    The 1x12 is 200w @ 8ohms

    If I run the RH450 into TWO RS112s, is it technically capable of pushing more wattage? Or am I just going to get the same volume through 2 cabs?
    read more...
    0 3,828
    • yogurtboy
      yogurtboy TC's support confirmed my guess that more air being moved = more volume. ie:



      "If you add a RS112 you will double the sound pressure and will be much louder than using only one. "
      • January 30, 2011
    • yogurtboy
      MatsD Sorry for hijacking your thread but a related question is if there is any difference in sound if i choose two RS112 instead of a single rs212 apart for the impedance that makes the former alternative able to sound louder.



      What I fear though is that having two smaller cabinets doesn't allow for as deep frequency response as having one larger, although the total volumes are equal. If this is a neglectible difference, I'd rather go for two RS122, not primarily for being able to play louder but because of weight and portability. I have a bad back and being able to split the weight between more units is a big plus.
      • March 25, 2011
  • yogurtboy
    Contributor - Level 2
    2011-01-29
    I own a RH450.

    Is it a good idea to plug it into a surge suppressor?

    I was on the computer a while ago when we had a power outage... I was thinking "eek, that's gotta be hard on the computer... good thing I wasn't practicing through my RH450"

    Plus, we all know playing live in small clubs how easy it is to blow fuses when EVERYTHING including 500w lights are plugged into 1 circuit.

    So what do you think? Can any damage be done to the head in a power outage?

    Is a surge suppressor a good investment, or a waste of $$$?
    read more...
    0 8,351
    • yogurtboy
      yogurtboy I'll reply to my own post, for the benefit of future generations



      TC support says "I don't think it is really necessary that you invest in a surge suppressor - unless these are very common where you live. If there is a single power cut now and then, the RH450 should easily handle it. "
      • January 30, 2011
    • yogurtboy
      snowleopard The AC Power at clubs, bars, halls, etc is going to range from ok - to horrid - to dangerous. Not only do you want to protect your gear but also your life from electrocution, it only takes one good zap to get you running to RadioShack. Supplementarily to surge protection you will also want to clean up EMI and RFI pollutants riding the AC line and smooth out parasitics in the AC waveform, this leads to better sound (less harshness for example) and less stress on the electronic components leading to longer life (since very few manufacturers will use components with voltage values beyond the expected or designed electrical criteria demanded of the circuits normal operation; to wit TCE has a not insignificant prior history of dead PSUs in their rack studio gear in part due to faulty and undervalued capacitors). Electronics equipment manufacturers' devices today are built to very tight tolerances in order to keep per unit costs down and profits up, this makes them far more susceptible to the vagaries of AC surges, particularly micro-surges who's destructive effect occurs over time and is not immediately apparent as it occurs.



      Most surge suppressors use R/C networks, Chokes, and MOV's, among other techniques, unfortunately what works for a computer will not necessarily work for an audio amplifier. A computer for the most part maintains a very steady current draw when operating (the "push" or "pull" to the voltage), an audio amplifier will generate many frequent fast transient peaks necessitating fast and high (though brief) current peak demands on the AC line, the average R/C network implementation will choke off delivery of the high current demands of the amplifier leading to a "weak" or "underwhelming" sound. The negligibility or impact of this varies from amp design to amp design, the oft called "slow" or "fast" response amplifiers which can be Solid-State or Valve types, and of course the kind of guitar and music playing you do.



      Importantly, MOV's are sacrificial components for which there is absolutely no reliable way to measure when it's going to fail (only that it has) or how effective the surge protection provided by the MOV remains at any given time during it's non-linear performance degradation curve before it catastrophically fails. Also, MOV's may themselves be protected by current-limiting fuses which serve to exacerbate the effects found in the above paragraph.



      So with the common place MOV type protective systems you can never really know if you're being provided the protection advertised by the equipment from the manufacturer for which you paid; only that it meets certain design criteria based upon the component specifications and recommended implementation from the electronics parts manufacturer under specific utilization and environmental parameters. You can't test it's effectiveness without busting it completely because there's no other way to know! (slick insurance product marketing or maybe a real world example of Schrödinger's paradox: where one could say that as long as The little black box between my Amp and the AC wall plug is closed and the stage lights are on, the system inside it simultaneously exists in a state of equal Quantum Superposition of being both protected/MOV-dead & unprotected/MOV-alive and so long as we believe the nice salesman and not worry thinking about it, Relational quantum mechanics applies and no definite result exists to be concerned about until the warranty expires, at which time we will qualify for an upgrade, irrespective of any dark energy we may have observed further reducing the life expectancy of the known Universe, if you believe that sort of thing). Basically nonsense.



      This is an issue (and not the only one) most MOV based Surge Protection vendors and manufacturers do not like to discuss since it undermines the cornerstone of their marketing - your equipments' protection, alternately they provide some obfuscating technobable more characteristically delivered by a Shaman priest to enlighten the aluminum hat and magic crystal crowd.



      That being said, there are effective real world solutions with a low impact negative affect on the connected devices, one of the most widely recognized is called Series Mode Surge Protection. The most well known proponent of which is Surgex at www.surgex.com (go to www.surgex.com/library.html for more complete and non-crystal magic techno talk explanations), I would suggest the SA15 or the SA82, which can be found at reasonable prices on eBay and can be easily put in a gig bag. Definitely a worth while investment.



      There are other solutions, though they are big, expensive, and not very portable and mostly found in larger recording and mastering studios.



      You'll probably hear a lot of opinions on this subject (some of the flamewars on the Audiophile forums on this subject are truly astonishing), but the facts of reality on it remain axiomatic: There is no guarantee on the quality of the AC voltage and its Current delivery where ever you are. There is no guarantee that the AC lines are at or exceed the Electrical Safety Codes of your area (Municipality, State, Federal) or have not been bypassed. There is no guarantee that the AC delivered to you is free of parasitics and anomalous interference (ie: something that was not there as it originally came out of the Electrical Utility Providers Generating Station). And finally, that all electronic equipments' quality of performance and reliability of operation is subject to the availability of a quality power supply.



      Products like those from Surgex, along with decent power cables, go a long way to mitigating these issues and providing some real measure to peace of mind, so you can better enjoy your musical groove.



      Hope this helps.







      PS: please do not call me out on the RQM as I am a rank amateur, thanks kindly to those who enjoyed the self indulgent joke.



      PSS: i do not work, have not ever worked for, or am affiliated with Surgex in anyway. in case your wondering.
      • February 1, 2011
    • yogurtboy
      snowleopard

      yogurtboy wrote:

      I'll reply to my own post, for the benefit of future generations



      TC support says "I don't think it is really necessary that you invest in a surge suppressor - unless these are very common where you live. If there is a single power cut now and then, the RH450 should easily handle it. "


      That response to your quite serious inquiry can only be characterized as being disingenuous or facetious, with a side order of patronizing impertinence. Either way, unhelpful. The following links provide some good starting points to elucidate on a complex and contentious subject matter:



      http://www.guitarnuts.com/technical/electrical/safety/index.php

      http://www.talkbass.com/forum/showthread.php?t=583455

      http://www.performing-musician.com/pm/nov07/articles/techspecrcd.htm

      http://www.equitech.com/articles/power.html

      http://www.equitech.com/articles/overview.html

      http://www.equitech.com/articles/rep1.html

      http://www.equitech.com/articles/rep2.html

      http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-a-power-conditioner.htm



      Bottom line, this is about protecting your expensive equipment (which you spent your hard earned dollars on) as well as protecting your continued good health, I'll take a leap in assuming the latter is of somewhat greater importance than the very laudable RH450. When it comes to working with electricity, safety first, always.
      • February 1, 2011
    • yogurtboy
      Morten

      snowleopard wrote:



      yogurtboy wrote:

      I'll reply to my own post, for the benefit of future generations



      TC support says "I don't think it is really necessary that you invest in a surge suppressor - unless these are very common where you live. If there is a single power cut now and then, the RH450 should easily handle it. "


      That response to your quite serious inquiry can only be characterized as being disingenuous or facetious, with a side order of patronizing impertinence. Either way, unhelpful. The following links provide some good starting points to elucidate on a complex and contentious subject matter:



      http://www.guitarnuts.com/technical/electrical/safety/index.php

      http://www.talkbass.com/forum/showthread.php?t=583455

      http://www.performing-musician.com/pm/nov07/articles/techspecrcd.htm

      http://www.equitech.com/articles/power.html

      http://www.equitech.com/articles/overview.html

      http://www.equitech.com/articles/rep1.html

      http://www.equitech.com/articles/rep2.html

      http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-a-power-conditioner.htm



      Bottom line, this is about protecting your expensive equipment (which you spent your hard earned dollars on) as well as protecting your continued good health, I'll take a leap in assuming the latter is of somewhat greater importance than the very laudable RH450. When it comes to working with electricity, safety first, always.




      Hi all,



      It should not be necessary to invest in a surge supressor.

      I can say that all our amps are tested very good to all the applied standards in this area and it's something we as a compagny take very serious.



      All the Best



      Morten Ehlers
      • January 15, 2013
  • gitarmorte
    Contributor - Level 2
    2011-01-29
    Hi, I'm currently using the Nova System in front of my amp, rather then having it in the efx loop, because I don't like the idea of having an additional pedal for the amp, and having to press two buttons to switch from distortion + effects, to clean + other effects.

    Is it possible to program the nova system to control a midi device which controls the amp via a stereo jack?

    If so, what would be the most suitable product? I've seen amp switchers that are controlled via midi, but most of them look very big, expensive and simply too fancy. Is this the product I'm looking for: http://www.performanceaudio.com/cgi/product_view.cgi?products_id=11740 ?

    My amp is a Carvin BelAir 212, with a stereo jack switch, for channel switching, and reverb on and off.
    read more...
    0 7,625
    • gitarmorte
      davidp158 I just noticed your post, and was curious about this, so I checked out the MIDI Solutions web site for info. It appears that their MIDI relay product can probably do what you're asking, but you should confirm if the relay and your amp's channel switching are 1/4" mono (tip + sleeve) or 1/4" stereo (tip + ring + sleeve). The MIDI Solutions web site doesn't specify if the relay supports mono or stereo connections.



      http://www.midisolutions.com/applicat.htm



      The Carvin FS22 photo shows the foot switch uses a TRS (tip + ring + sleeve) plug. If this is the foot switch you use, you may need TRS with the MIDI Solutions relay.



      Good luck, and please post if what you find out.
      • February 2, 2011
    • gitarmorte
      davidp158 Check out this youtube video:

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GJA5IbU6CDg
      • February 2, 2011
    • gitarmorte
      gitarmorte Hey, thanks a lot David!



      Yes, I use the stereo plug FS22 footswitch. I guess I'll have to send the MIDI solutions people an E-mail to find out wether the plug is stereo or mono... I suspect that it's only mono, though...
      • February 12, 2011
    • gitarmorte
      davidp158 Yep, the MIDI Solutions pedal is a "mono" pedal, so it can only serve one function. Do you need more than one relay, or more than one MIDI function?



      BTW, the MIDI Solutions relay is connect via a MIDI cable. Per the youtube video, he uses the FS2 to select user presets, which also change amp channels via MIDI commands sent to the relay.





      gitarmorte wrote:

      Hey, thanks a lot David!



      Yes, I use the stereo plug FS22 footswitch. I guess I'll have to send the MIDI solutions people an E-mail to find out wether the plug is stereo or mono... I suspect that it's only mono, though...
      • February 23, 2011
    • gitarmorte
      ifailedshapes If you want the best solution on the market, look at the Amp Gizmo by RJM Music Technology.



      If you don't need the best, the Control Switcher by Voodoo Lab would also work.



      MIDI Solutions makes a Dual Footswitch Controller, which is basically the same product you have already found, but with a stereo (TRS) jack. This product will be a pain to program since there are no hardware switches.



      So, the MIDI Solutions product (2 switches, no hardware programming switches) is $199.

      The Voodoo Lab product (4 switches, each with hardware switch and LED) is $139.

      The RJM Music Tech product (8 switches, hardware switch, and LED) is $329.

      Voodoo Lab Control Switcher (4 switches)
      • February 25, 2011
  • Bassike
    Contributor - Level 1
    2011-01-25
    I know that many of us are confused by the fact that you could 3 RS cabinets.

    but my question is, if i use a 4X10 and a 2X10; would all the speakers receive evenly the same amount of power?
    I taught that if you use this combination of 4X10 and a 2X10, you would have to use a head that goes down to 2 ohms and a 4 ohms 4X10 and a 8 ohms 2X10 so all the 6 speakers would sound even.

    am I wrong?

    what would be the result of this combination if I use a Rh head and RS cabs.

    anyone used this before.

    cheers
    read more...
    0 3,028
    • Bassike
      MTB777 TC's Cabs are rated at less than 8 ohm so you can use any 3 of their cabs and be safe, but it has to be their cabs. Use another manufacterors cabinets and you have to use 2 - 8 ohm cabs max. or 4 ohm max.
      • July 24, 2011
    • Bassike
      MTB777 Check at talkbass.com as there are many discussions and treads on this issue.
      • July 24, 2011
  • Songjoy
    Contributor - Level 1
    2011-01-25
    As a new owner, I'm trying to get the G-Natural to work with several guitars I own, which have widely different output signals (from extremely hot to very quiet). I use various guitars live, and cannot switch the Instrument Gain setting on stage every time I change guitars.

    Please correct me if I'm wrong:
    - Input gain is a universal setting, so there is NO WAY OF STORING PATCHES WITH DIFFERENT INPUT GAIN SETTINGS for different instruments.
    - Output levels can be saved in patches, but the max. setting is O db, so I can only DECREASE the level of a louder instrument (and save the patch) so that the much quieter instrument can stay at O db.

    Is this right? Is there some elegant way of either storing input gain or adjusting output levels to accommodate different instruments?
    read more...
    0 10,055
    • Songjoy
      HuskyDog I am looking for an answer to the same question, for my banjo and mandolin outputs.
      • December 28, 2011
    • Songjoy
      HuskyDog Hunting through the other posts, I have found one that says that the Output Level is stored with the patch. All the others I think are global. I have tried it out and found it works fine. So you can set up one or more patches for each instrument and change the output level on each and store them. I use one for my mandolin with the left output ( i only use one) set to 0db and one set for my banjo with the left output set to about -6db and that evens out the volume. I use the same guitar lead, so just plug in the required instrument and select the appropriate patch.



      Hope that helps.
      • January 9, 2012
    • Songjoy
      amber14 I use one for my mandolin with the left output ( i only use one) set to 0db and one set for my banjo with the left output set to about -6db and that evens out the volume.
      • January 29, 2015
    • Songjoy
      Summer so do i how to solve it
      • August 12, 2015
Go to page