Re: Anyone else worried that lots of newbies in this sub are approaching this all too mechanically?
Contributor - Level 2

Anyone else worried that lots of newbies in this sub are approaching this all too mechanically?

 open my arms to anyone who wants to pick up a new instrument or learn to DJ. But I'm relentlessly seeing people ask questions about if it's okay to mix multiple genres? Whether to use cross faders or channel faders? What the perfect BPM for house is? How should I transition tracks when mixing Dubstep etc.?

It's absolutely okay to ask these questions but the answer is almost always: dude you can do whatever you want! You're a DJ. You have the tools be it your CDJs, your Traktor, your Belt Drives or even your smart phone app to be a creative artist and mix and blend the music that YOU love how EVER YOU see fit. The world of music is your musical playground. If you're asking the next guy how to crossfade Techno you will become the next guy. Do you. Sure you can take inspiration from DJs you love but ultimately these tools that you have in front of you, they are a vehicle for you to have fun and express yourself. internet sweepstakes software

Learn what your effects do. Learn about gain. Learn the very basics of beat matching and that's it. Your levels, your effects, your faders.. They're your playground dude. Do with them as you please. Do you. Just do you.

Love double drops? Become the master of them. Love scratching? Slay it! Love insane echo and reverb rewind/wheel up mania? Do it. Just want to casually cross fade one track into another over the course of 3 minutes because you love 10-15 minute balaeric beats? Do it. Want to start at 75bpm and work your way slowly up to 180bpm over the course of 6 hours? No one's stopping you. Rather I implore you do it.

Stop worrying about how everyone else is doing it. Christ, I still don't even know what 30% of the effects on my mixer really do and I've been mixing as a hobbyist DJ for 13 years. But the bottom line is I'm a way better DJ than I was even 4 years ago. And for years ago I was way better than I was 4 years before that. And the whole time I've had nothing but fun. The research I've done along the way? Googled best equipment on whatever my budget has been and when I transitioned from Virtual DJ to CDJs 9 years ago I had to learn to beatmatch. And now I'm finally learning to use Vinyl (like a big boy) and it's not been too tricky. Otherwise there really isn't much els

bhaikosalam Contributor - Level 2 2019-08-17

2019-08-17

Anyone else worried that lots of newbies in this sub are approaching this all too mechanically?

 open my arms to anyone who wants to pick up a new instrument or learn to DJ. But I'm relentlessly seeing people ask questions about if it's okay to mix multiple genres? Whether to use cross faders or channel faders? What the perfect BPM for house is? How should I transition tracks when mixing Dubstep etc.?

It's absolutely okay to ask these questions but the answer is almost always: dude you can do whatever you want! You're a DJ. You have the tools be it your CDJs, your Traktor, your Belt Drives or even your smart phone app to be a creative artist and mix and blend the music that YOU love how EVER YOU see fit. The world of music is your musical playground. If you're asking the next guy how to crossfade Techno you will become the next guy. Do you. Sure you can take inspiration from DJs you love but ultimately these tools that you have in front of you, they are a vehicle for you to have fun and express yourself. internet sweepstakes software

Learn what your effects do. Learn about gain. Learn the very basics of beat matching and that's it. Your levels, your effects, your faders.. They're your playground dude. Do with them as you please. Do you. Just do you.

Love double drops? Become the master of them. Love scratching? Slay it! Love insane echo and reverb rewind/wheel up mania? Do it. Just want to casually cross fade one track into another over the course of 3 minutes because you love 10-15 minute balaeric beats? Do it. Want to start at 75bpm and work your way slowly up to 180bpm over the course of 6 hours? No one's stopping you. Rather I implore you do it.

Stop worrying about how everyone else is doing it. Christ, I still don't even know what 30% of the effects on my mixer really do and I've been mixing as a hobbyist DJ for 13 years. But the bottom line is I'm a way better DJ than I was even 4 years ago. And for years ago I was way better than I was 4 years before that. And the whole time I've had nothing but fun. The research I've done along the way? Googled best equipment on whatever my budget has been and when I transitioned from Virtual DJ to CDJs 9 years ago I had to learn to beatmatch. And now I'm finally learning to use Vinyl (like a big boy) and it's not been too tricky. Otherwise there really isn't much els

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Valued Contributor - Level 2

Re: Anyone else worried that lots of newbies in this sub are approaching this all too mechanically?

Hi Bhaik ( @bhaikosalam ), 

 

Welcome to the community. Thank you and well said.  I've observed similar things in several areas and, while not assigning blame, I think it's at least partially due to the always-connected society we now live in.  Rather than experimenting and creating something new, it's easier to go to Youtube and find 20 videos showing you how to copy someone else's technique.  Want to sound like The Beatles? Buy a set of Abbey Road Studios plugins.  I see the same thing when it comes to problem solving.  Rather than reading through a manual or just stepping back and thinking for a minute about how something might work, it's easier to go to Google and search for an answer. 

 

I've started using a catch-phrase of "Disconnect and Reconnect."  Disconnect from your phone and reconnect with your brain.

 

Thanks again,

Ken

 

If you want "Loud", then run a piece of sheet metal through a table saw. --Ivan Beaver