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Contributor - Level 1

X32 to another mixer

Hello guys,

 

I am a guitarist who is also in charge of sound engineering in a worship team. Our team tends to tour around a lot, so we always use different church sound systems everytime! Our solution to that was buy a X32 and connect the outputs of X32 to whatever sound systems they have.

 

However, because outputs of X32 are line levels and most analog mixers' input XLR are mic levels, it brings a few problems. Even with nearly 0 gain in the two inputs, the sound is wayy overloaded. Do you guys have a good solution for this??

 

 

MrWoo87623 Contributor - Level 1 2019-05-15

2019-05-15

X32 to another mixer

Hello guys,

 

I am a guitarist who is also in charge of sound engineering in a worship team. Our team tends to tour around a lot, so we always use different church sound systems everytime! Our solution to that was buy a X32 and connect the outputs of X32 to whatever sound systems they have.

 

However, because outputs of X32 are line levels and most analog mixers' input XLR are mic levels, it brings a few problems. Even with nearly 0 gain in the two inputs, the sound is wayy overloaded. Do you guys have a good solution for this??

 

 

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Trusted Contributor - Level 3

Re: X32 to another mixer

@MrWoo87623 If turning down the main fader doesn't clear up the overdriven signal, try a level matching box like the Ebtech LLS-2-XLR. Alternately, you could route the LR bus to a pair of Aux outs into a pair of direct boxes. As long as the direct box isn't overdriven, you'll now have a mic level signal.

Super Contributor - Level 2

Re: X32 to another mixer

@MrWoo87623 

I agree with Dave (@DaveMorrison)  that an interface with an isolating transformer is a good idea. It can help to remove noise that can result from connecting sound systems together. Driving mic-level inputs from a line-level source requires more attenuation though. I would use a 40dB attenuator like this in each output from your mixer. These could be used on their own or with an isolating transformer such as Jensen PI-2XX  to reduce any ground-loop noise (buzz). You could use a pair of Jensen GLX transformers as a lower-cost alternative to the PI-2XX.

 

Using an attenuator allows you to keep your mixer operating at normal output levels - which gives better noise performance. It is better to place the attenuators/transformers close to the receiving mixer so that the lower level signal is not running through long cables.

Contributor - Level 3

Re: X32 to another mixer

It would seem a bit odd to me that any decent installation mixer wouldn't also have line and aux inputs as well as the usual mic channels. So in any place that I have been to that required me to feed my mixer into theirs or vice versa It would be most unusual if a suitable high level input couldn't be found. 

Super Contributor - Level 2

Re: X32 to another mixer


@RichardYClark wrote:

It would seem a bit odd to me that any decent installation mixer wouldn't also have line and aux inputs as well as the usual mic channels. So in any place that I have been to that required me to feed my mixer into theirs or vice versa It would be most unusual if a suitable high level input couldn't be found. 


You would think so, Richard, but I have encountered house sound crew who claimed not to have any line-level inputs available. I suspect it was more a case of not being willing or able to change their normal way of working  - and resistance to suggestions from a visitor. I carry XLR attenuators and transformers as quick fixes to connectivity problems.